Cma conference 2019

“My family, we’re all musicians, we’re all artists, and my brother and sister, they usually make money by juggling at the stoplights or busking in Old San Juan,” she says. “And if there’s no stoplights left because they were all torn down in the hurricane, that means they don’t have their usual spot, and in Old San Juan, it’s not like any tourists are going to come to a disaster island. That is not something that we can count on.”

Instructed by composer and producer Martin D. Fowler (This American Life, Limetown, etc.), this course is an all-encompassing boot camp in one of the most widely used and most multi-functional DAWs out there: Logic Pro X. It’s used by pro-level producers, songwriters, engineers, and composers of all types to achieve the sound they’re searching for. Logic is also extremely affordable as far as DAWs go, making it perfect for the home-recording musician.

One of the best things about the drive to produce holiday albums is the way it sometimes brings musicians together and spurs interesting collaborations, like this unlikely musical two-some. Enjoy!

Grant for theatre production

Open mics make lofty promises about what they’re able to offer songwriters of all levels. I’m here to tell you that they’re still a waste of your time.

Evan Zwisler is a NYC-based musician who is most notably known for his work with The Values as a songwriter and guitarist. He is an active member of the Brooklyn music scene, throwing fundraisers and organizing compilations for Planned Parenthood and the Anti-Violence Project. He started playing music in the underground punk scene of Shanghai with various local bands when he was in high school before going to California for college and finally moving to New York in 2012.

It’s really something, even in robotic MIDI form. The chromaticism leapt right out at me on first hearing. It’s worth going on a little journey so you understand what chromaticism is and why it’s a big deal. The chromatic scale is the one you get when you play all 12 notes in the Western tuning system, all the notes on the piano or guitar or whatever. The chromatic scale sounds pretty bad. It’s too much information. The notes don’t feel like they’re related in any particular way, like there’s any logic to them.

And then there’s Björk’s 2011 concept album Biophilia. By all accounts, this is one heck of a gesamtkunstwerk! The album was conceived and recorded between 2008-2011, inspired somewhat by the work of her environmental organization, the Náttúra Foundation, and explores the links between nature, technology and music. The album was also released on ten interactive mutimedia apps (one per song) that link the themes of the album to concepts in musicology.

Student-Artist: Chris Bassaline

Magicmusic.com 5.0 (1) music instructor

Quick tip: Although some of us still have cars old enough to have tape decks, or keep actual physical radios around to leave on for our dogs while we’re gone (just me?), you’d probably do well to also provide a digital download card so fans can love the nostalgia while being able to listen in the modern age.

The first chords of your song will set the emotional precedent that your lyrics should ultimately follow. Here’s a few suggestions for starting strong!

SongTown is a really unique community of songwriters that help inspire growth and deliver unparalleled support to their readers, members, and peers. If you’re a writer looking for constructive criticism and helpful tips, definitely check their blog and service and events out.

In a song that was spliced together from the independent compositions of different feuding band members, John McVie’s contribution takes prominence here at the end. Played along an E minor scale, it starts with a long A and ascends to the C, before descending via a run of notes to resolution on the E. Simple yet effective, especially with the repetition, it builds up with intensity into a driving tempo over Mick Fleetwood’s drums. But one thing that shouldn’t be overlooked is how much musical tension is created between the bass and the lead guitar as a result of what I call “reverse” pedal point.

Eventually, the bass line drops down an octave and changes its stubborn pedaling to play chord tones along with the rest of the rhythm section. It starts with the same old D and A. Next, it moves to C♯ and A for the A chord. Then it moves to the B chord but still keeps the pressure on with that non-chord-tone A. Finally, it rounds off with a pleasant, resolute walk-up, bouncing back up between notes of the major scale and A, which is the root of the chord. Classic!