Pabst blue ribbon merchandise

If you’re looking for an intimate house/basement show, local bloggers/curators No Smoking Media are bringing the party on Friday with several bands, including Stuyedeyed. Based out of Brooklyn, Stuyedeyed plays a fresh blend of latin-psych-rock. Nelson Antonio Espinal, the band’s lead singer and guitarist, collaborated with his bandmates to write Birth and Cursed (the two demos out currently) with one goal in mind: “to bring only the most excellent of vibes to any and all listeners.”

When you’re a musician, it helps to have a job that you can take off every now and then when you go on tour or into the studio, here’s a few of our faves!

Since the housing bubble burst in 2008, banks are skittish about lending money to nontraditional earners like songwriters, here’s how you can beat them.

Pbr music foundation grant

But sometimes getting a good price isn’t enough to justify hoarding equipment. If you got it for a good price chances are you could turn it around get just as much for it — if not more! Which leads me to my next point.

Got a band website that you’re newly finished with? Try integrating these apps, widgets, and services so you can capture data and serve your fans better.

We’ll return to the story of its eventual completion later, noting that at the time of his death Berg had already completed all the thematic compositional material for the opera. Lulu is famous for pushing the strictures of serialism to their limits. Serialism is one of the most important musical movements of the 20th century, and in brief it treats all 12 notes of the chromatic scale as possessing equal value and forbids any regression back to conventional tonality.

Takada’s debut LP has just been rereleased in the US by Palto Flats and in Europe by WRWTFWW Records, pressed to vinyl for only the second time in 34 years, to meet its overwhelming demand. In the years since this record has been streamable online, original copies of the LP have sold for as much as $1,000. Takada, herself, is newly represented internationally and touring festivals to sold-out audiences. I even bought my copy of the LP last week and feel, well, awesome about it!

A bad relationship can look like anything from unresolved issues between you and a bandmate or collaborator, to being banned from a local venue in your hometown. Not prioritizing and maintaining your musical relationships can lead to major problems in your career, like people in your band quitting suddenly on tour, a bad reputation in your local scene, etc. Burning bridges seems logical in the heat of the moment, but they can come back to haunt you.

Grants for rappers

Like any new entrepreneur, songwriters may themselves experience cash flow problems and look for additional financing to keep the lights on. However, unlike businesses that have inventory to put up as collateral, songwriters have only their intellectual property and the royalties that property can earn. This limits the options from traditional banking sources and requires songwriters to seek out alternative funding that’s available as an advance against royalties or from selling some rights in exchange for quick cash.

Not all of us have access to the kind of gear that the Boards are rocking. As usual though, we can find some good digital approximations on the internet. One of my absolute favourites is James Peck’s VHS Audio Degradation Suite. It provides emulations (with optional speaker simulation) of old video tape audio playback, based on machines in various states of disrepair. If anything digital is going to get you even close to Boards of Canada’s bevy of broken-down gear, this is it. While it’s free, it only works through Native Instruments’ paid Reaktor 6 soft synth platform. If you don’t already have that, you can try it out for 30 days.

In Soundfly’s new course, The Art of Hip-Hop Production, you’ll learn the nuances of producing beats, arranging tracks, and creative sampling techniques.

Producers: You are also songwriters in your own right. What’s the difference anyway? You are the one making compositional decisions with every click. You should make sure to negotiate publishing percentages where you can. Register your splits properly and collect the money you are due.

Solution: Create criteria. One of the biggest mistakes ambitious musicians make is overbooking just for the sake of playing out. I constantly hear colleagues complaining about gigs their bandleaders probably shouldn’t have taken in the first place. A band member once made me promise I would only take gigs if I could answer “yes” to at least two of these questions: (1) Is it lucrative enough to ensure that no band member is losing money (including the pay they would sacrifice if they had to turn down another show because of this one)? (2) Will it give us real exposure or positively build the band’s identity? (3) Could it be the most fun we’ve had all year?